Questions Legal

What is immoral traffic (prevention) act 1956?

Airtract

Pranet Sharma

Justice is truth in action

Human trafficking is any activity that results in profitable sexual victimization, violation of different human rights, organ donation, and forced labor.1 Over time this obscene dilemma has spread so much in society that the government had to reinforce the law regarding human trafficking even stronger and more intact.

Govt. records insinuate that more than 20,000 Women & Children was Trafficked in India in 2016. 07th May, New Delhi: As per government data, almost 20,000 women and children were victims of human trafficking in India in 2016, and these statistics showed a rise of 25% compared to 2015. 

Even though human trafficking is scattered to all the sections of society, this is more generally considering the sexual exploitation and transshipping of women and girls to other countries. But the fact is that human trafficking has developed so severely that the human trafficking platform doesn't distinguish between men, women, girls, or boys. It is assessed that over 2 million women and children are trafficked for adultery into the red streets of India.

WHAT IS IMMORAL TRAFFIC(PREVENTION)ACT 1956?

The Immoral Traffic (Prevention) Act, 1956, incipiently the Abolition of Immoral Traffic of Women and Girls (SITA), 1956, is the Central legislation dealing with trafficking in India. However, even though the name attributes to the immoral trafficking of people, the ITPA’s expanse is narrowed to commercial sexual exploitation or prostitution and castigates those who aid and approve commercial sexual exploitation, including patrons and those who earn from the prostitutes. It also grants for welfare means towards the recovery of victims in the form of guarding homes to be set up and operated by state governments. 

PUNISHMENTS UNDER THE ACT

  1. Punishment for keeping a brothel or allowing premises to be used as a brothel - imprisonment for a term of not less than one year and not more than three years and also with fine, which may extend to two thousand rupees.

  2. Punishment for living on the earnings of prostitution - imprisonment for a term which may extend to two years, or with fine which may extend to one thousand rupees, or with both.

  3. Procuring, including or taking person for the sake of prostitution - imprisonment for a term of not less than three years and not more than seven years and also with fine which may extend to two thousand rupees.

  4. Detaining a person in premises where prostitution is carried on - imprisonment of either description for a term which shall not be less than seven years but which may be for life or for a term which may extend to ten years and shall also be liable to fine.

  5. Prostitution in or in the vicinity of public places - imprisonment of either description for a term which shall not be less than seven years but which may before life or for a term which may extend to ten years and shall also be liable to fine.

  6. Seducing or soliciting for prostitution - imprisonment for a term which may extend to six months, or with fine which may extend to five hundred rupees.

  7. Seduction of a person in custody - imprisonment of either description for a term which shall not be less than seven years but which may be for life or for a term which may extend to ten years and shall also be liable to fine:

 The fact that trafficking is a conglomerate offense involving both method and result and spanning many fields of human rights breach does make it hard to arbitrate. It may need an ascending process, as apparent from the changes in the international protocols hovering trafficking.

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